Security Sector Reform

Security Sector Reform

Security Sector Reform

Defence Institution Building in Ukraine at Peace and at War

Polyakov, Leonid. "Defence Institution Building in Ukraine at Peace and at War." Connections: The Quarterly Journal 17, no. 3 (2018): 92-108.

Introduction

In 1991, independent Ukraine inherited from the Soviet Union sizeable conventional military contingent equivalent to Europe’s second largest armed forces and had on its territory the third world largest nuclear arsenal.[1] The process of conversion of this rather chaotic massive post-Soviet force and building the coherent national military of Ukraine went through two major stages – peace-time decline (1991-2013) and war-time transformation since the start of Russian invasion to Crimea in 2014.

17.3.07_polyakov_dib_ukraine.pdf — Downloaded 46 times

Ukraine’s Security Sector Reform: Is Ukraine Taking Western Advice?

Bugriy, Maksym. "Ukraine’s Security Sector Reform: Is Ukraine Taking Western Advice?" Connections: The Quarterly Journal 17, no. 3 (2018): 72-91.

IIntroduction

Since Ukraine joined NATO’s Partnership for Peace program in 1994, and especially following the 2014 Euromaidan, the West has been supporting Ukraine in its security sector reform. The long time of the reform design and implementation may cause difficulties in assessing the reform’s progress. It has merit, therefore, to assess the Security Sector Reform in Ukraine in the aspects of its two key variables: governance and effectiveness.

17.3.06_bugriy_ukraine_ssr.pdf — Downloaded 27 times