Military Doctrine

Military Doctrine

Military Doctrine, field manuals

NATO and Intermediate Force Capabilities: Why Human Effects Matter

Foley, Shannon, Caitlin Jackson, Susan Aros, and Anne Marie Baylouny. "NATO and Intermediate Force Capabilities: Why Human Effects Matter." Connections: The Quarterly Journal 21, no. 2 (2022): 123-134.

Introduction

On February 24, 2022, when Russia invaded Ukraine, the international order was impacted sharply and abruptly. Russia’s invasion put the North American Treaty Organization (NATO) on center stage. As a contribution to international security, NATO’s deterrence capabilities take many forms. From nuclear weapons to cyberattacks, to be effective, deterrence must be scalable across a conflict spectrum that includes non-kinetic actions.

21.2.09_ifc_human_f.pdf — Downloaded 435 times

Gaming Intermediate Force Capabilities: Strategic Implications of Tactical Decisions

Dobias, Peter, Kyle Christensen, and William Freid. "Gaming Intermediate Force Capabilities: Strategic Implications of Tactical Decisions." Connections: The Quarterly Journal 21, no. 2 (2022): 97-109.

Introduction

Hybrid Threats

In recent years, analysis of the international security environment has increasingly focused on hybrid threat tactics in the grey zone.

21.2.07_gaming.pdf — Downloaded 454 times

Developing a NATO Intermediate Force Capabilities Concept

Nelson, John. "Developing a NATO Intermediate Force Capabilities Concept." Connections: The Quarterly Journal 21, no. 2 (2022): 67-84.

Introduction

What Motivates the Need for an IFC Concept?

Adversaries know NATO’s lethal capabilities and the thresholds for their use. And they exploit this. They avoid direct symmetrical engagements, instead maneuvering below lethal thresholds, pursuing their aims observed but undeterred. Or, they act indirectly through proxies or intermediaries, blending in and engaging only at times and places of their choosing.

21.2.05_nelson.pdf — Downloaded 452 times